Cytoreductive Surgery and HIPEC

Surgical Associates at Virginia Hospital Center is among very select centers around the country offering an aggressive approach for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis with Cytoreductive Surgery and Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC). Our surgical oncologist, Hatem Halabi, MD, FACS has extensive research and clinical experience in the treatment of such complex disease. Our Cancer Center is a winner of the Outstanding Achievement Award from the Commission on Cancer, a program of the American College of Surgeons. We treat patients from around the country for this type of disease.

The peritoneum lines your abdominal cavity and organs inside your abdomen. Primary peritoneal malignancies are rare like peritoneal mesothelioma and primary peritoneal carcinoma. Most commonly the peritoneum is the site of tumor spread from other organs in the peritoneal cavity, which is medically defined as peritoneal carcinomatosis. Cancers of the appendix, colon, rectum, stomach, and ovary could spread to the peritoneum.

Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) for peritoneal malignancy is an extensive, lengthy and complex procedure, usually lasting on average more than 10 hours. It entails the aggressive removal or destruction of all visible tumors present throughout the peritoneal surfaces and on intraperitoneal organs.

hipec

In our program, CRS is often combined with Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) – a procedure in which a warmed chemotherapy solution is used to bathe the peritoneal cavity and intra-abdominal organs to prevent microscopic tumor left after surgery from growing back.

CRS and HIPEC is an aggressive and effective approach for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis and primary peritoneal tumors. CRS/HIPEC has been shown to prolong survival and possible cure, for patients with tumors that have spread in the peritoneal cavity.

Publications by Surgical Associates on CRS/HIPEC

El Halabi H, Gushchin V, et al. The role of cytoreductive surgery and heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC) in patients with high-grade appendiceal cancer and extensive disease. Ann Surg Oncol ; 19(1): 110-114, 2011.

El Halabi H, Gushchin V, et al. Prognostic Significance of Lymph Node Metastases in Patients with High-grade Appendiceal Cancer. Ann Surg Oncol ; 19(1): 122-125, 2011.

El Halabi H., Macdonald R., et al. Delay of Cytoreductive Surgery and Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (CRS/HIPEC) in Patients with Appendiceal Neoplasm. The American Surgeon; 78(7): 745-749, 2012.

El Halabi H., Gushchin V., et al. Port site metastases in patients with stage IV appendiceal neoplasm. Ann Surg Oncol. Februrary 2012; 19(1) 174: S99.

El Halabi H., Ledakis P, et al. The role of cytoreductive surgery in patients with carcinomatosis from high-grade appendix cancer in the era of modern systemic chemotherapy. J Clin Oncol June 2011: 29:2011(suppl; abstr 4080).

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Surgical Associates
at Virginia Hospital Center

1625 N. George Mason Dr., Ste 334
Arlington, VA 22205
Tel: 703.717.4250
Fax: 703.717.4251
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